TreatiseTreatise

Trial Handbook (Spring 2019)

 by Kent Sinclair
 
 Copyright: 2019

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402433603
  • Page Count: 0
  • Number of Volumes: 1
  •  

Now available for pre-order!

Trial Handbook is the one-stop resource you can trust in the planning, trial, and post-trial stages of litigation. Designed for quick reference in the courtroom, Trial Handbook is keyed to the Federal Rules of Evidence and focuses on the presentation of proof and the evidentiary problems faced by counsel.

Packed with practical checklists, charts, outlines, sample jury selection questions, Trial Handbook gives you the knowledge and tools to:

  • develop solid trial briefs and strong case plans
  • prepare lay and expert witnesses and organize your exhibits more effectively
  • master voir dire to maximize your chances of getting the most sympathetic jurors
  • make a clear record at trial to aid jurors’ understanding of your case
  • build a rapport and your credibility with the jury throughout the trial
  • use opening statements to put your cases, clients, and proof in the most favorable light
  • give summations that blend evidence and issues to paint a thoroughly persuasive picture
  • exploit discovery materials at trial to get an additional edge
  • lay the proper foundation for various forms of evidence
  • capitalize on the powerful probative impact of visual aids at trial
  • apply proven direct examination and cross-examination techniques
  • use pretrial, trial, and post-trial motions to gain strategic advantages
  • draft clear, legally sound jury instructions that subtly sway judges

At the heart of Trial Handbook is its unique Evidence Guide, now also included as a laminated fold-out, which clearly explains the meaning, purpose, operation, and history of every rule, including how each rule applies to other cases and how leading cases construe a particular rule.

Volume 2, the Case Authority, includes thousands of case summaries of decisions under the rules, arming you with the latest evidentiary resources to help you prevail at trial. Trial Handbook also comes with a USB flash drive containing the entire text of both volumes.

  Table of Contents
  Preface
Chapter 1: Final Preparation for Trial
  • § 1:1 : Planning the Trial2
    • § 1:1.1 : Review of the Pleadings2
    • § 1:1.2 : Review of Preparation Status3
    • § 1:1.3 : Analysis of Needed Proof—By Issue and Witness3
      • [A] : Elements of Proof3
      • [B] : Witness Plans4
    • § 1:1.4 : Testimony Time Estimates4
  • § 1:2 : Folders, Notebooks, and Files for Use at Trial5
    • § 1:2.1 : Witness Preparation Checklists7
  • § 1:3 : Motions Before Trial7
    • § 1:3.1 : Subject Matter Jurisdiction11
    • § 1:3.2 : Personal Jurisdiction11
    • § 1:3.3 : Venue Motions11
    • § 1:3.4 : Motions Against the Pleadings12
    • § 1:3.5 : Motions re Joinder of Claims or Parties12
    • § 1:3.6 : Provisional Remedies12
    • § 1:3.7 : Motions to Dismiss12
    • § 1:3.8 : Motions for Summary Judgment13
    • § 1:3.9 : Motion Procedures13
    • § 1:3.10 : Appeal13
  • § 1:4 : Pretrial Evidentiary Rulings14
    • § 1:4.1 : Rulings in Limine14
    • § 1:4.2 : Sanction or “Preclusion” Orders14
    • § 1:4.3 : Copies of Orders15
  • § 1:5 : Trial Briefs16
  • § 1:6 : Stipulations Before Trial17
    • § 1:6.1 : Role of Stipulations17
    • § 1:6.2 : Issues17
    • § 1:6.3 : Facts17
    • § 1:6.4 : Form of the Stipulation17
  • § 1:7 : Admissibility and Admission in Evidence18
  • § 1:8 : Admissions Shaping the Proof18
  • § 1:9 : Pretrial Conferences and Orders20
    • § 1:9.1 : Generally20
    • § 1:9.2 : Rules Governing the Pretrial Conference21
      • [A] : The “Mandatory” Scheduling Order Under Federal Rule 1625
      • [B] : Conduct of Conference29
      • [C] : The “Final” Pretrial Conference31
      • [D] : Sanctions33
    • § 1:9.3 : Typical Contents of a Pretrial Order34
    • § 1:9.4 : Changing the Pretrial Order37
  • § 1:10 : Subpoenas38
    • § 1:10.1 : Attendance of Witnesses38
    • § 1:10.2 : Protections and Rights of Subpoenaed Persons43
    • § 1:10.3 : Duties in Responding to Subpoena46
    • § 1:10.4 : Contempt Sanction47
  • § 1:11 : The Final Bench Conference Before Trial48
  • § 1:12 : Sidebar and Chambers Conferences During Trial49
Chapter 2: Jury Selection
  • § 2:1 : Introduction51
    • § 2:1.1 : Roles of Judge and Counsel51
    • § 2:1.2 : Outlines of Two Common Procedures52
      • [A] : Typical Jury Selection Process52
      • [B] : Alternative “Struck Jury” Procedure for Jury Selection53
  • § 2:2 : Federal Statutes and Rules54
  • § 2:3 : Conduct of the Questioning56
    • § 2:3.1 : Sample Notes for Voir Dire57
  • § 2:4 : The Jury Chart for Counsel60
  • § 2:5 : Sources of Information60
  • § 2:6 : Objections to the Adversary’s Voir Dire61
  • § 2:7 : Pitfalls to Avoid in Jury Selection61
Chapter 3: Opening Statements
  • § 3:1 : Overview65
    • § 3:1.1 : Order65
    • § 3:1.2 : Length66
    • § 3:1.3 : Goals66
  • § 3:2 : Waiver of Opening66
  • § 3:3 : Keys to a Successful Opening Statement66
  • § 3:4 : Contents of the Opening68
  • § 3:5 : Objections to Opening Statements69
  • § 3:6 : Pitfalls During Opening70
Chapter 4: Presentation of Proof
  • § 4:1 : Making a Proper Record at Trial72
    • § 4:1.1 : Why Make a Record?73
    • § 4:1.2 : Presence of the Reporter73
    • § 4:1.3 : Techniques for Making a Clear Record73
  • § 4:2 : Direct Examination74
    • § 4:2.1 : Goals74
    • § 4:2.2 : Key Concepts75
    • § 4:2.3 : Leading Questions75
      • [A] : False Solutions to the Problem of Leading76
      • [B] : Leading and Non-Leading Phraseology77
    • § 4:2.4 : Preparation: Key to Success77
    • § 4:2.5 : Refreshing Recollection and Past Recollection Recorded78
    • § 4:2.6 : Redirect and Recross Examinations79
    • § 4:2.7 : Hostile and Adverse Examinations80
    • § 4:2.8 : Nine Empirically Proven Techniques for Good Direct Examination81
    • § 4:2.9 : Pitfalls to Avoid82
  • § 4:3 : Handling Exhibits83
  • § 4:4 : Common Evidentiary Foundations84
    • § 4:4.1 : Foundation for Testimony in General84
      • [A] : Conversations84
      • [B] : Telephone Conversations84
      • [C] : Refreshing Recollection85
      • [D] : Past Recollection Recorded85
      • [E] : Deposition Impeachment85
      • [F] : Prior Statement Impeachment86
      • [G] : Admissions86
      • [H] : Expert Testimony86
      • [I] : Lay Opinion87
      • [J] : Habit87
      • [K] : Reputation or Character87
        • [K][1] : Traditional Mode87
        • [K][2] : Opinion Mode87
      • [L] : Testimony of a Child88
    • § 4:4.2 : Physical Evidence88
      • [A] : Authentication of a Writing89
        • [A][1] : Witness Present at Creation or Signing89
        • [A][2] : Witness Recognizes Handwriting89
      • [B] : Photographs89
      • [C] : Motion Pictures89
      • [D] : Diagrams90
      • [E] : Official Records90
      • [F] : Business Records90
      • [G] : Computer Records91
      • [H] : Reply Letters91
      • [I] : Scientific Evidence92
      • [J] : X-Rays92
      • [K] : Summary Exhibits93
    • § 4:4.3 : Voir Dire Examinations93
  • § 4:5 : Objections94
    • § 4:5.1 : In General94
    • § 4:5.2 : Whether to Object94
    • § 4:5.3 : Making the Objection95
    • § 4:5.4 : Supporting and Opposing Objections96
    • § 4:5.5 : The Need to Obtain a Ruling97
    • § 4:5.6 : Necessity for Repeating Objections99
    • § 4:5.7 : Offers of Proof99
    • § 4:5.8 : Common Errors in Objecting100
    • § 4:5.9 : Common Objections100
      • [A] : Objections to the Form of a Question100
      • [B] : Objections to Testimony and Exhibits101
      • [C] : Objections to Competency of Witnesses102
      • [D] : Objections on Privilege and Related Grounds102
      • [E] : Objections to Conduct of a Witness103
      • [F] : Objections to Conduct of Counsel103
      • [G] : Objections to Conduct of the Judge104
  • § 4:6 : Cross-Examination105
    • § 4:6.1 : Fundamentals105
    • § 4:6.2 : Common Errors107
  • § 4:7 : Use of Discovery Fruits at Trial108
    • § 4:7.1 : Deposition Transcripts108
      • [A] : Videotaped Depositions at Trial110
    • § 4:7.2 : Interrogatory Answers110
    • § 4:7.3 : Rule 36 Admissions110
    • § 4:7.4 : Documents Produced in Discovery111
  Evidence Guide: Federal Rules of Evidence at a Glance
Article I & XI: General Provisions and Miscellaneous Rules
Article II: Judicial Notice
Article III: Presumptions in Civil Cases
Article IV: Relevance and Its Limits
Article V: Privileges
Article VI: Witnesses
Article VII: Opinions and Expert Testimony
Article VIII: Hearsay
Article IX: Authentication and Identification
Article X: Contents of Writings, Recordings, and Photographs
Chapter 5: Closing Argument
  • § 5:1 : In General601
  • § 5:2 : Preparation602
  • § 5:3 : Organization and Presentation602
    • § 5:3.1 : Typical Elements602
      • [A] : Initial Remarks603
      • [B] : Identification of the Issues603
      • [C] : Burden of Proof603
      • [D] : Analysis of the Evidence604
      • [E] : Dealing with the Opponent’s Case604
      • [F] : Handling the Law605
      • [G] : Damages605
      • [H] : Conclusion606
    • § 5:3.2 : Manner of Presentation606
  • § 5:4 : Objections to Closing Argument607
Chapter 6: Jury Instructions
  • § 6:1 : Introduction609
  • § 6:2 : Proposed Jury Instructions609
    • § 6:2.1 : Preparation609
    • § 6:2.2 : Clarity and Legal Accuracy of Requests610
    • § 6:2.3 : Favorable, Nonargumentative Wording611
    • § 6:2.4 : Supporting and Opposing Requests611
    • § 6:2.5 : “Pattern” Instructions: Use and Abuse613
    • § 6:2.6 : Checklist of Common Topics for Jury Instructions615
      • [A] : Introductory Matters615
      • [B] : Evaluation of Evidence616
      • [C] : Parties and Burdens617
      • [D] : Substance of Offense or Civil Claim618
      • [E] : Deliberation and Verdict618
  • § 6:3 : Objections to Jury Instructions619
  • § 6:4 : Findings and Conclusions by the Court619
    • § 6:4.1 : In General619
    • § 6:4.2 : Proposed Findings and Conclusions620
Chapter 7: Trial and Post-Trial Motions
  • § 7:1 : Motion for Judgment As a Matter of Law623
    • § 7:1.1 : Standards for Granting624
    • § 7:1.2 : Timing625
  • § 7:2 : Post-Verdict Motion for Judgment As a Matter of Law626
    • § 7:2.1 : Relation of Pre- and Post-Verdict Motions626
    • § 7:2.2 : Time for Making626
    • § 7:2.3 : Necessity of Motion627
    • § 7:2.4 : Discretion of the Court627
    • § 7:2.5 : Partial Judgments628
  • § 7:3 : Motion for a New Trial628
    • § 7:3.1 : Grounds629
    • § 7:3.2 : Time for Making629
    • § 7:3.3 : Procedure630
    • § 7:3.4 : New Trial on Initiative of Court630
    • § 7:3.5 : Partial New Trial630
  • § 7:4 : Motion for Relief from Judgment or Order631
    • § 7:4.1 : Grounds632
    • § 7:4.2 : Procedure634
    • § 7:4.3 : Other Methods of Relief634
  • § 7:5 : Other Motions634
    • § 7:5.1 : Motion to Amend Judgment634
    • § 7:5.2 : Relief from Clerical Mistakes635
  Index
  Case Authority
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“A valuable reference tool that should be a part of every litigator’s library.”
    
– New York Law Journal

“For federal court practitioners, [Trial] Handbook is a must.”
    
– Trial Lawyer


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